Bodog Stays Ahead Of The Curve With Online Gambling Domain Name

Watching while many of their competitors have been subjected to indictments in the US, Bodog has taken steps to ensure they are not next on the Department of Justice’s hit list. Last week, ten gambling domains were seized after indictments came down from a federal grand jury in Baltimore.

Bodog did not want to be number eleven, so they quickly changed their domain name from Bodog.com, to Bodog.eu. The European domain should ensure that Bodog will steer clear of having their domain seized by authorities in the US. It is a proactive approach that other online gaming sites may soon explore.

“Right now, the online gaming sites cannot be too cautious,” said Gaming Analyst Steve Schwartz. “They do not know when or where the next set of seizures may come, and companies like Bodog have too much invested in the industry to take any chances.”

Already, Doylesroom, Full Tilt Poker, and PokerStars, have been targets. The US government is sending a message that they want foreign companies out of their market. It is an attempt that many believe is in preparation of having the market all to themselves once lawmakers pass online gambling regulations in the country.

“I think the crackdown stinks in the short term, because I lost my places to play online poker, which I enjoy,” said Maury Braskins. “But in the long run, I think all of us players will be better off, because this will force lawmakers to consider what we want, and that is places to play where our money is safe and the integrity of the game is upheld.”

In light of the recent indictments, one last month and one last week, online gambling sites have started to pull out of the US market. The same type of activity occurred back in 2006 when the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act was conceived. Democratic legislators have called the UIGEA “ill-conceived”, and they now have the support of many Conservatives in their attempt to overturn the law.